The North American High Tory Tradition (2016) – A Review

br2992916But, you might ask, “Why write a book about High Toryism? In a time when liberalism and American republicanism so permeate every inch and corner of life, surely the concept and notion of High Toryism is fading away – is passé?” Such questions only serve to highlight the urgency of Dart’s task. He has recognized, only too clearly, that if we allow the “Moloch” of liberalism to remain unchecked and unquestioned, we will lose an important part of ourselves as Canadians at cultural, political and spiritual levels. Professor Dart has stated the matter succinctly: “In one sense there is a counter to cultural amnesia in my work. I’m putting the historical pieces of the drama back together again.” This statement highlights, in a graphic way, the importance of Dart’s latest book within the cannon of Canadian political thought. Continue reading

Grant Society on The North American High Tory Tradition

ggs2992016Review: The North American High Tory Tradition (2016), September 26, 2016. By Daniel Velarde

What can the Tory tradition mean for us today, in the age of multinationals and American hegemony, and half a century after we were taught “the impossibility of Canada in the modern age?” What would a 21st-century Tory philosophy look like, and what would be its historically new role or vocation? “Love,” it was written, “is inseparable from memory, which seeks to preserve what must pass away,” and it is to memory that Ron Dart turns in The North American High Tory Tradition Continue reading

Neo-Reaction on North American High Toryism

bck16192016Likewise, the growth of the global liberal anti-order has come from America, a child of the English civilization. If broader Western civilization can hope to achieve its Restoration without dividing against itself, then it is to the heart of America itself that the Restoration must reach. And for this it is necessary that we remember the Anglo-Tory faith. If a Restoration in the Anglosphere is possible, then it will be by tapping into currents of thought which preserved and guided us before the rise and reign of liberalism. Continue reading

Stephen Leacock’s ‘Arcadian Adventures with the Idle Rich’

slaairStephen Leacock was known as one of the finest writers in the first half of the 20th century—a spellbinding and unique Canadian version of Dickens, Twain and Swift. Leacock has been called a Tory humanist and that he was—an Anglican grounded and rooted in the best of the classical Anglican way. Most know Leacock through his kindly satire, Sunshine Sketches of a Little Town (1912), but the companion and must read novel to Sunshine Sketches is Arcadian Adventures with the Idle Rich (1914). Continue reading

The Unsolved Riddle of Social Justice

scales.Inequality begins from the very cradle. Some are born into an easy and sheltered affluence. Others are the children of mean and sordid want. For some the long toil of life begins in the very bloom time of childhood and ends only when the broken and exhausted body sinks into a penurious old age. For others life is but a foolish leisure with mock activities and mimic avocations to mask its uselessness. And as the circumstances vary so too does the native endowment of the body and the mind. Some born in poverty rise to wealth. An inborn energy and capacity bid defiance to the ill-will of fate. Others sink. The careless hand lets fall the cradle gift of wealth. Continue reading

High Tories, Left and Right

As someone who self-identifies as a “High Tory” I have on occasion been asked to explain what exactly a High Tory is. I usually respond by explaining what a Tory is first and then explaining what is suggested by the qualifying adjective High. While Tory can be simply a nickname for a member or supporter of the Conservative Party I use the term to mean someone who holds to a certain set of principles and convictions and a certain way of looking at life and the world. The expression “small c conservative” is also used by those who wish to identify themselves as being conservative other than in the partisan sense but I prefer the word Tory because it hearkens back to an older form of conservatism, that exemplified by the eighteenth century poet, biographer, essayist, and lexicographer Dr. Samuel Johnson. Continue reading